Les notes du jour

For my essay on the market university: California is the worst state in terms of education vs prison investment: they spend $11K per student and $64K per prisoner each year.

In news of my other essay:

+ in the early 19th century, “whitening”was not yet a wish. And people did not want to admit that free women of color could be married or respectable. Plaçage is a white myth, a U.S. literary trope, based actually in fear of black men, although it is apparently true that some of those who came to N.O. from Haiti after the revolution had to take recourse in prostitution.

+ Clark: fear of the mulata displaced fear of Haitians

+ look again at the end of El Zarco, and at Amalia and Martín Rivas. Note how Sommer’s “foundational fictions” fail to found. And find out who used the term, “incest ex machina.”

+ novels permeated with the idea of possession, ownership; identities that are layered

+ novels that lend themselves to readings that support both liberating projects and repressive ones; these projects and readings don’t seem to enter into dialogue with each other but to cancel each other out, stifle each other, so we get this confused discourse.

Axé

3 Comments

Filed under Race book, ULS Presentation

3 responses to “Les notes du jour

  1. Shakti

    in the early 19th century, “whitening”was not yet a wish. And people did not want to admit that free women of color could be married or respectable. Plaçage is a white myth, a U.S. literary trope, based actually in fear of black men, although it is apparently true that some of those who came to N.O. from Haiti after the revolution had to take recourse in prostitution.

    Clark: fear of the mulata displaced fear of Haitians
    How do tignon laws figure into this? Do you agree with Virginia M. Gould’s interpretation of Governor Miró’s law? The wikipedia page heavily implies that it was about status competition through white men.

    • Z

      I am not sure but that sounds very romanticized. That was 18th century, before the Haitians arrived, before the Louisiana Purchase and the US travelogues. In the colonial period there were all these rules about outward signs of status. Rectors of the universities in Lat. Am. could only have two, not more sword-bearing footmen with them when they went through the streets. I would bet the tignon was about reserving white status for the few, and that all of this was a little less sexy than it sounds.

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